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Mutualist Blog: Free Market Anti-Capitalism

To dissolve, submerge, and cause to disappear the political or governmental system in the economic system by reducing, simplifying, decentralizing and suppressing, one after another, all the wheels of this great machine, which is called the Government or the State. --Proudhon, General Idea of the Revolution

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Location: Northwest Arkansas, United States

Sunday, February 12, 2006

Phaedrus on the Church of Reason

From Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Compare this to Paul Goodman's treatment of "intrinsic" and "extrinsic" motivation in The Community of Scholars. Replacing intrinsic with extrinsic motivation isn't just a sad necessity. It is vital to the existence of all hierarchical organizations. In the case of education, a student who pursues an intellectual interest for its own sake is dangerous to the educational hierarchy, because he sees it at best as a means to his own end, and at worst as a hindrance. To be considered safe, he must learn for the sake of the gold star on his paper, or the new line on his resume. Starting in school, the future human resource must be broken of the habit of doing anything for its own sake, and instead be inculcated with a desire for whatever carrot the organization has to offer.

Phædrus’ argument for the abolition of the degree-and- grading system produced a nonplussed or negative reaction in all but a few students at first, since it seemed, on first judgment, to destroy the whole University system. One student laid it wide open when she said with complete candor, "Of course you can’t eliminate the degree and grading system. After all, that’s what we’re here for."

She spoke the complete truth. The idea that the majority of students attend a university for an education independent of the degree and grades is a little hypocrisy everyone is happier not to expose. Occasionally some students do arrive for an education but rote and the mechanical nature of the institution soon converts them to a less idealistic attitude.

The demonstrator was an argument that elimination of grades and degrees would destroy this hypocrisy. Rather than deal with generalities it dealt with the specific career of an imaginary student who more or less typified what was found in the classroom, a student completely conditioned to work for a grade rather than for the knowledge the grade was supposed to represent.

Such a student, the demonstrator hypothesized, would go to his first class, get his first assignment and probably do it out of habit. He might go to his second and third as well. But eventually the novelty of the course would wear off and, because his academic life was not his only life, the pressure of other obligations or desires would create circumstances where he just would not be able to get an assignment in.

Since there was no degree or grading system he would incur no penalty for this. Subsequent lectures which presumed he’d completed the assignment might be a little more difficult to understand, however, and this difficulty, in turn, might weaken his interest to a point where the next assignment, which he would find quite hard, would also be dropped. Again no penalty.

In time his weaker and weaker understanding of what the lectures were about would make it more and more difficult for him to pay attention in class. Eventually he would see he wasn’t learning much; and facing the continual pressure of outside obligations, he would stop studying, feel guilty about this and stop attending class. Again, no penalty would be attached.

But what had happened? The student, with no hard feelings on anybody’s part, would have flunked himself out. Good! This is what should have happened. He wasn’t there for a real education in the first place and had no real business there at all. A large amount of money and effort had been saved and there would be no stigma of failure and ruin to haunt him the rest of his life. No bridges had been burned.

The student’s biggest problem was a slave mentality which had been built into him by years of carrot-and- whip grading, a mule mentality which said, "If you don’t whip me, I won’t work." He didn’t get whipped. He didn’t work. And the cart of civilization, which he supposedly was being trained to pull, was just going to have to creak along a little slower without him.

This is a tragedy, however, only if you presume that the cart of civilization, "the system," is pulled by mules. This is a common, vocational, "location" point of view, but it’s not the Church attitude.

The Church attitude is that civilization, or "the system" or "society" or whatever you want to call it, is best served not by mules but by free men. The purpose of abolishing grades and degrees is not to punish mules or to get rid of them but to provide an environment in which that mule can turn into a free man.

The hypothetical student, still a mule, would drift around for a while. He would get another kind of education quite as valuable as the one he’d abandoned, in what used to be called the "school of hard knocks." Instead of wasting money and time as a high-status mule, he would now have to get a job as a low-status mule, maybe as a mechanic. Actually his real status would go up. He would be making a contribution for a change. Maybe that’s what he would do for the rest of his life. Maybe he’d found his level. But don’t count on it.

In time...six months; five years, perhaps...a change could easily begin to take place. He would become less and less satisfied with a kind of dumb, day-to-day shopwork. His creative intelligence, stifled by too much theory and too many grades in college, would now become reawakened by the boredom of the shop. Thousands of hours of frustrating mechanical problems would have made him more interested in machine design. He would like to design machinery himself. He’d think he could do a better job. He would try modifying a few engines, meet with success, look for more success, but feel blocked because he didn’t have the theoretical information. He would discover that when before he felt stupid because of his lack of interest in theoretical information, he’d now find a brand of theoretical information which he’d have a lot of respect for, namely, mechanical engineering.

So he would come back to our degreeless and gradeless school, but with a difference. He’d no longer be a grade-motivated person. He’d be a knowledge-motivated person. He would need no external pushing to learn. His push would come from inside. He’d be a free man. He wouldn’t need a lot of discipline to shape him up. In fact, if the instructors assigned him were slacking on the job he would be likely to shape them up by asking rude questions. He’d be there to learn something, would be paying to learn something and they’d better come up with it.

Motivation of this sort, once it catches hold, is a ferocious force, and in the gradeless, degreeless institution where our student would find himself, he wouldn’t stop with rote engineering information. Physics and mathematics were going to come within his sphere of interest because he’d see he needed them. Metallurgy and electrical engineering would come up for attention. And, in the process of intellectual maturing that these abstract studies gave him, he would he likely to branch out into other theoretical areas that weren’t directly related to machines but had become a part of a newer larger goal. This larger goal wouldn’t be the imitation of education in Universities today, glossed over and concealed by grades and degrees that give the appearance of something happening when, in fact, almost nothing is going on. It would be the real thing.


Anonymous joanne said...

Of course it's odd he still sees educational institutions as the ideal vehicle for self-motivated learning. Seems there is some degree of conflict there that is unresolvable (between set sylabus and intrinsic motivation etc.).

February 13, 2006 8:44 AM  
Blogger Kevin Carson said...

I think he saw the surviving educational institutions that would exist in such an environment as voluntary associations: a lot more like Illich's learning networks, or the scholars' and students' guilds of the Middle Ages.

February 13, 2006 11:11 AM  
Blogger troutsky said...

I myself never had any formal education but have had dozens of different jobs, have travelled to dozens of different of countries and have found I have a constant thirst for new knowledge which can be satisfied for the most part by University and public lectures,libraries, conversation and salons and the internet.And I live in the middle of nowhere.

February 13, 2006 12:01 PM  
Blogger Kevin Carson said...


One of the few things I liked about Wesley Clark: when the press asked him if he was educated, he said "Yes; I read books." I'm sure he "clarified" that when the public educationist establishment jumped on him with both feet, and reassured them that "education" was a commodity that could only be secured from properly qualified "professionals."

February 13, 2006 12:30 PM  
Blogger Black Guile said...


Thanks for this post. I responded on my own blog with some thoughts on the tainted Kaiserist history and general awfulness of the PhD degree.

February 15, 2006 11:42 AM  
Blogger Adam said...

As I understand, some prominent/elite universities and colleges, such as Brown, really try to de-emphasize grades/requirments and encourage self-motivated study.

Also, I'm a bit surprized at the hostility to the Ph.D. degree, since it is in Ph.D. programs where institutions abandon the "learn this" attitude and really encourage students to take the initiative for their own studies, and think independently. I'll have to read the criticism.

Okay, it seems that the complaint is against the degree, rather than the program of education, and even more so, the complaint is against the restrictions that the state places on higher education. I can understand that, but I'll need to mull it over some.

February 15, 2006 5:19 PM  

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